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A Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia combines huge real-time battles with engrossing turn-based campaign, set at a critical flashpoint in history. Anglo-Saxons, Gaelic clans and Viking settlers clash for control. What Kingdom will you build?

 
 

The second in a trilogy and sequel to the award-winning Total War: WARHAMMER, Total War: WARHAMMER II brings players a breathtaking new narrative campaign, set across the vast continents of Lustria, Ulthuan, Naggaroth and the Southlands. The Great Vortex Campaign builds pace to culminate in a definitive and climactic endgame, an experience unlike any other Total War title to date.

 
 

Addictive turn-based empire-building with colossal, real-time battles, all set in a world of legendary heroes, giant monsters, flying creatures and storms of magical power.

 
 

A free-to-play, team-based strategy game, thrusting players into battles of epic proportions. Play as a hero of the past, command your army in 10v10 battles on ancient battlefields. Make yourself a legend.

 
 

The next instalment in the multi award-winning PC series that combines turn-based strategy with real-time tactics, Total War: ATTILA casts players back to 395 AD. A time of apocalyptic turmoil at the very dawn of the Dark Ages.

 
 

Emperor Edition is the definitive edition of ROME II, featuring an improved politics system, overhauled building chains, rebalanced battles and improved visuals in both campaign and battle.

 
 

Total War: SHOGUN 2 features enhanced full 3D battles via land and sea, which made a name for the series, as well as the tactical campaign map that many refer to as the heart and soul of Total War.

 
 

Whether you play as the legendary general or against him, the outcome of war can never be guaranteed. The course of history relies on your ability to lead your troops through the most intense battles as never seen before in a Total War game.

 
 

Empire: Total War takes the Total War franchise to the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment —a time of political upheaval, military advancements, and radical thought, captured in stunning detail.

 
 

The indirect sequel to 2002’s Medieval: Total War, Medieval 2 is set between years 1080 and 1530 and focuses on medieval warfare, religion and politics in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East.

 
 

Set during the rule of the late Roman Republic and the early Roman Empire, Rome: Total War is a real-time tactics and turn-based strategy game that takes place across Europe, North Africa and the Near East.

 
 

From the lush grasslands of Western Europe to the arid deserts of Northern Africa, from the first Crusade to the fall of Constantinople, expand your influence and secure your reign as you build a dynastic empire to stretch across four centuries.

 
 

Set against the backdrop of the Sengoku Jidai (Warring States) period from the 15th to the beginning of the 17th century, Shogun: Total War is a real-time tactics and turn-based strategy game with a strong focus on historical authenticity.

 
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After nearly a century of escalating raids, the Vikings left an indelible stamp on Britannia, altering the course of its history forever. Not least of all culturally, as many smaller bands of Vikings had settled around the isles prior to Alfred’s defeat of the Great Viking army.

These smaller factions traded an existence of ceaseless conflict for a new life in Britannia, establishing their own petty principalities, intermarrying and ultimately becoming part of the warp-and-woof of Britannic life. This mingling of cultures, so emblematic of British history, helped create the rich melting-pot of attitudes, beliefs and language that has made the isles and their people so unique.

Some Vikings never truly settled however; their designs were grander, their hunger for conquest and greatness unquenched. These Sea Kings would continue their bellicose work, heedless of any decree from England’s upstart ruler…

We’re nearly there with Thrones of Britannia now, and a few weeks back we invited some press and influencers to play the latest build. We let them loose with the factions of Gwined (Wales), Circenn (Scots), and Northymbre (post-Wedmore landed-gentry Vikings. Plot twist: still angry!). As this is the first in what we hope will be a series of Total War Saga titles, we are – understandably we hope – anxious to get it right, and we’ve been encouraged to hear the positive reactions to the many changes we’re making while we panel-beat the ATTILA engine into a leaner, sportier, more Anglo-Saxon shape. It’s been a delight to read and watch many of those impressions so far.

In 878 AD, the Great Viking Army was defeated by King Alfred and faced a new life of enforced settlement in the east of Britannia. A bitter pill for the invaders to swallow, in light of their grand vision for a new Scandinavian kingdom. The previous century had seen escalating Viking incursions across the isles. What began as sporadic coastal raids intensified over time as the Vikings began to glean the scale of plunder Britannia could offer. A sense of organisation crept into their plans, and in due course the Danes, supported by the Swedes and Norwegians, raised a great army with the intention of conquering Britannia and avenging the death of the legendary Viking warlord Ragnar Lothbrok, executed by the King of Northumbria in 865 AD.

Previously we’ve talked about the three different types of victory conditions in Thrones of Britannia: conquest, fame, kingdom, and hinted at another, the ultimate victory condition. Today I’m going to tell you a little more about it. Obviously if you would prefer to discover what lies in store as it happens in the game, without any expectations, probably best to stop reading now.

It’s been a long hard winter for the Total War teams, but there’s not been a lot of hibernating with Empire Divided, Tomb Kings and Desert Kingdoms all sprouting through the snow. What’s more, there’s a new crop of releases just starting to blossom, and even a new team being added for an interesting new project.

Can you feel that chill wind still blowing from the North though?

One problem we’ve been wrestling with at CA for a while now is the interaction of mods with our games when an update lands. As nearly a third of users use mods for ROME II, there’s quite a high chance of an out-of-date mod causing issues within the newly updated game.

Frequently, players can sort it out themselves; and if you’re reading this you’re quite likely to be someone who would realise this, disable/uninstall the problem mod and reinstall it when an update for it is released by the mod maker.

The Welsh Kingdoms descended from the Celtic Britons who occupied much of the island of Britain from the Iron Age, into and beyond its Romanisation in the First Century.

Not long after the Romans departed, the lands would come to be dominated by Anglo-Saxons who had arrived from northern Europe. Ironically, the term ‘Welsh’ derives from the Anglo-Saxon term for foreigner, ‘wealas’, which they applied to the native Britons. The Anglo-Saxons flourished and many of the old Brittonic kingdoms began to disappear.

The Britons who inhabited the Welsh peninsula were able to hold ground against attacks from the Anglo Saxons, Gaels and numerous bands of Vikings. These kingdoms were among the last bastion of Romano-British culture but there was a shift towards a more militaristic way of life in order to survive against these persistent invaders.

Britons also still occupied what is now southern Scotland. Here, the kingdom of Strat Clut, known as the Strathclyde Welsh to the Anglo-Saxons, defended their realm under constant pressure from Picts and Vikings.

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